RLASKEY::words

grep for naming conventions

I’ve used grep for years, now, though in the past few days I found a nice combination of it and some other command line utilities to do a bit of an audit as to how I’m naming methods and variables in the code I’m writing.

-oh # that’s how it works

-o
a shortcut for --only-matching, this option won’t show the whole line, just the part that matches your search criteria
-h
a shortcut for --no-filename, this will hide the first part of the normal output, so you can look for trends across files more easily

Put these two together, and you can then pipe the output over many files into sort and uniq -c to get an alphabetized, counted list of every instance of the pattern you want to find. You can also then pipe that all into a final sort -n which will sort by the count, such that the biggest fish fall to the bottom.

Use case: camelCase vs. underscores

Putting this all together, you can get a general command something like this:

grep -oh $PATTERN $(find . -name \*${EXT}) \
	| sort | uniq -c | less

To find underscore_separated_words, use PATTERN='\w\+_\w\+'; for camelCase, let PATTERN='[[:lower:]]\+[[:upper:]]\w\+'.

Finally, set EXT='.php' to look over just your PHP files, or change it to any extension of the types of files you want to inspect. You can also use grep’s -r flag with a target directory if you want to recurse through all files, rather than limiting yourself to files with a particular extension.

Leave a Reply